Stress may Lead you to Type 2 Diabetes

Stress may Lead you to Type 2 Diabetes

There are many life factors like obesity, high blood pressure and sedentary lifestyle which contributes to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, according to a recent research, other than these factors stress also plays an important role in further increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, especially in women.

The study was presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions conference in Chicago on November 10th. The study showed that events which trigger stress whether on the short-term basis or on the long-term basis due to the office or housework resulted in twice the risk of case type 2 diabetes risk among elderly women.

“Psychosocial stressors as risk factors for diabetes should be taken as seriously as other embraced diabetes risk factors,” said Jonathan Butler, the study’s lead researcher and a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, San Francisco’s Center for the Study of Adversity and Cardiovascular Disease.

Diabetes is one of the major health issues, which targeted around 30.3 million Americans in 2015, as per the recent analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this 30.3 million people 12 million people were elderly, 65 or older.

“We’ve been trying to understand the relationship between stress, mental health and diabetes risk for a while,” said Dr. Sherita Hill Golden, professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. Emerging evidence suggests that psychosocial stress and how people cope with stress may impact cardiometabolic health.

Diabetes is described as a chronic disease where the body is not able to produce enough hormone that it can carry out proper sugar homeostasis in the body. Blood concentrated with glucose sugar can lead the person to a lot of health problems like heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease.

Along with family history and age, high cholesterol, increased blood pressure, obesity, and physical inactivity also play a huge role in making the person more susceptible to type 2 diabetes. However, researchers have planned to look beyond these factors.

“We’ve been trying to understand the relationship between stress, mental health and diabetes risk for a while,” said Dr. Sherita Hill Golden, professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. Emerging evidence suggests that psychosocial stress and how people cope with stress may impact cardiometabolic health.

The studies which were carried out previously only focused on specific things like stress during work or manifestations of depression or anxiety. While Butler focused on the joint linkage between them in women with time.

The researchers studied 22,706 elderly women who participated in Women’s Health Study and, whose age was above 72 and had no heart disease. They focused on collecting information related to acute and chronic stressors by following the women for 3 consecutive years.

The acute stress is mainly due to traumatic life events while chronic stress is due to work, neighborhood, family and relationships, finances, and racism. Women who faced increased levels of chronic and acute stress had double the risk of diabetes.

“From a public health perspective, health care providers should inquire about psychosocial stressors as part of their assessment of diabetes risk,” said Dr. Michelle A. Albert, the study’s senior author and a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

“We know that lifestyle intervention works for diabetes prevention, but that can be challenging if people experience cumulative stressors, like losing a job or caring for a family member, that hinder them from engaging in healthy behaviors like exercising, eating right or smoking cessation,” she said. “It’s important to assess and understand a patient’s social history. They may need a referral to a counselor or social worker.”

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